The story of Rain Harvesting

September 23, 2010

http://www.youtube.com/v/hQNBKEM2pbU?version=3

Price of water to rise

September 22, 2010

The threat of a significant rise in water costs has been on the horizon for many years. This is as the country is running out of fresh water resources. We may be faced with water tariff increases similar to we will experience with our electricity bills.

Concerned water users will be able to reduce their water consumption by harvesting rainwater and recycling greywater. Rain harvesting could take a household off the grid over many of the winter months as their water tanks will be storing every drip of water.

Water tariff increases

Water rate increase

Water prices for South Africans could in the near future quadruple as a result of the escalating pollution of the country’s water resources by the country’s mining industry.

“If we don’t find a special development where we can mine without affecting water resources, the prices of water will go up. Someone will need to pay for either the treatment of water or getting more water, and I believe that person is the consumer,” said Koos Pretorius of the Federation for a Sustainable Environment.

Pretorius, who was speaking on the sidelines of the AgriSA’s Water Conference in Kempton park, said the sad reality was between 30 and 40 percent of South Africa’s power utility Eskom’s electricity generation was still reliant on coal.

“We are mining sensitive areas where there is a conflict of interest between mining, agricultural production and the quality of water. We need to move away from this urgently,” Pretorius said.

The farming community had been complaining that it was carrying the costs of water pollution because water fetched from rivers contained heavy metals that accumulated in produce.

He said these vast areas were growing day by as they were about coal mines in 2001 and there were about 400 mining rights applications and another staggering 6 000 applications for prospecting rights in Mpumalanga alone.

Water Affairs and Environment (DWA) Minister Buyelwa Sonjica said her department was busy with plans to formulate a strategy along with the Chamber of Mines and was also planning on board the Department of Mineral (DMR).

“The strategy will be two faced. The first part will be dealing with the imminent and looming crisis and the second part will centre on the long term sustainability of water quality,” she said.

Sonjica said in the 2009/10 financial year, her department had issued a total 239 directives, 31 of these had been resolved positively and 14 were currently before the Courts.

“The rest of these are undergoing the rigorous process of being resolved. We will intensify this aspect of our work to ensure that we bring to book all the offenders,” she said.

– Business Report

Rainwater Harvesting

September 17, 2010

Rainwater Harvesting system – Water Rhapsody Grand Opus

We can provide you with the means to collect hundreds of tons of water by harvesting rainwater!
Water Rhapsody has made it possible for one to harvest rainwater and get this system to pay for its cost of installation in a reasonable period of time.
Over recent years water costs combined with sewerage rates have escalated far faster than inflation. This means that it has become worth your while to install rainwater harvesting systems. You may now augment supply from the traditional sources of dams etc, and rainwater harvesting as a way to augment supply has become imperative.
You no longer need to install water tanks close to your house to harvest rainwater. These rainwater tanks can now stand anywhere you like, because we get to deliver this water to wherever your water tanks stand, so the rainwater tanks can stand unobtrusively at your home or commercial building. Our Rainwater Harvesting FAQ’s explain how rainwater is harvested, delivered by gravity to rainwater tanks, and delivered to your whole household during the rain season in a sustainable manner. Furthermore how our system of harvesting rainwater is viable i.e. the system can pay for itself within a reasonable period of time.Rain Harvest

Rainwater Harvesting – FAQ

Free Rain water Harvesting quote

Rainwater Harvesting system – Water Rhapsody Grand Opus

We can provide you with the means to collect hundreds of tons of water by harvesting rain water!
Water Rhapsody has made it possible for one to harvest rainwater and get this system to pay for its cost of installation in a reasonable period of time.
Over recent years water costs combined with sewerage rates have escalated far faster than inflation. This means that it has become worth your while to install rainwater harvesting systems. You may now augment supply from the traditional sources of dams etc, and rainwater harvesting as a way to augment supply has become imperative.
You no longer need to install water tanks close to your house to harvest rainwater. These rainwater tanks can now stand anywhere you like, because we get to deliver this water to wherever your water tanks stand, so the rainwater tanks can stand unobtrusively at your home or commercial building. Our Rainwater Harvesting FAQ’s explain how rainwater is harvested, delivered by gravity to rainwater tanks, and delivered to your whole household during the rain season in a sustainable manner. Furthermore how our system of harvesting rainwater is viable i.e. the system can pay for itself within a reasonable period of time.Rain Harvest

Water RhapsodyAgainst a global rainfall average of 870mm per year, South Africa receives a pitiful 450mm, making it the world’s 30th driest country.

Water Rhapsody, with 15 years experience in water conservation, is number 1 in South Africa in Grey water recycling systems and Rainwater harvesting systems.

Carbon footprint

Rainwater Harvesting

It is now viable to harvest rainwater for your whole household. This includes rainwater harvesting, storing and pumping rainwater for bathing, showering, toilet flushing, pool, laundry and irrigation. Rainwater harvesting together with other Water Rhapsody products can save up to 90% of your water bill.

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Grey Water

A bath uses 120 litres and a shower 80 litres of water. When used, that water is called grey water. You pay for it, and then it all goes down the drain. Water Rhapsody Grey Water System uses this grey water to immediately irrigate your garden, saving you a substantial portion of your water bill.

WWF Green Trust Award

Water Rhapsody a WWF Green Trust award winner can save us up to 90% of our municipal water bills.” WWF
WWF Green Trust Award

Constantia Waldorf School recycling centre

Constantia Waldorf School Recycling Centre

The newly build Constantia Waldorf School Recycling Center is setting a trend for the of recycling. This is a vision driven by a parent of a student attending the school. Unsorted recyclable  goods can be dropped off at the school recycling center where it is then sorted into various piles for collection.

Recyclable goods sorting area

Recyclable goods sorting area

The profits generated form the centre will be used to compensate the friendly helper who sorts the recyclable goods and to pay for further eco-sustainability systems.

The Recycling centre accepts all the usual recyclable matter including batteries, light bulbs, bread bag clips and e-waste.

As an educational and eco-sustainability tool the recycling center harvests its rainwater that falls on the roof of the brown box collection room and stores the rainwater in a water tank. The rainwater will be used for rinsing, garden irrigation and making sure sorters are able to walk away with clean hands.

Rainwater harvesting at recycling centre

Rainwater harvesting tank (Constantia Waldorf School)

Over the last few months there has been a influx of new businesses selling rainwater harvesting systems. This is no surprise to me as we have been warned of the drought cycle underway. Cape Town will be forced to once again enforce water restrictions as a means to control demand. With the population growth that the City has experience throughout the previous years, the change exists that there will be water outages, not just water restriction.

Many of the new start-ups are still smoothening out the glitches and gaining practical experience with every job they start. These new start-ups might be winning the price war. You might have yourself a nice looking water tank in your garden but ask yourself:

If you have not got the following as standard items in your installations,

a)    An emergency supply of municipal water in the water tanks so that the user is guaranteed of water 24/7/365.

b)   Relief from the need for a hot water cylinder dripper.

c)    A balanced water system preventing one from receiving scalding water at one moment, and cold water the next in the shower.

d)   A means of re-inflating the pressure vessels.

e)    A very neat way of reverting to municipal water by easy to operate user friendly instructions.

f)     An override box consisting of all the operating valves to make an elaborate system simple.

g)    All the safety gear of very high quality to make sure that your precious water is not lost to a municipal shut off or municipal leak.

h)   Everything that the municipality might require and more to comply with any regulations.

i)      Back up of technical know-how.  On matter stretching form plumbing, irrigation ecology, water conservation and sustainability.

have you got the system that South Africans have been endorsing for over 16 years? You can still choose Water Rhapsody?

Cape Water Solutions is a proud partner of Water Rhapsody and a premier supplier of Nell and Jojo Tanks. Contact you dealer for you emergency water supply.

Water tanks save energy

August 6, 2010

Do you know that by installing a rainwater tank you will be taking a very decisive eco-friendly step towards solving our water scarcity issues? Not only that but when you store rainwater you save the energy required to treat and pump fresh water to your house. Instead of having your municipal fresh water pumped to your house you will have it in your backyard. You get to decide when and how you wish to use it. It will be there when ever you want it.

Rainwater harvesting is a highly positive step towards leading a green life. The heart of green movement is the goal of minimizing the carbon footprint that each one of us will be leaving behind. The more resources we use the greater the carbon footprint. Being eco-friendly just means that we use nature’s resources effectively and avoid wasting the resources.

It is one thing to keep your water use down to a minimum and yet another to harvest rainwater for use. These two approaches complement each other allowing our overall efforts to bring about an effective solution against the reality of water scarcity.

A water tank in your home will inspire your friends and neighbours to conserve water. Cape Town in entering a drought cycle again, similar to the drought of 2004. When you have a  water tank you will not be crippled by water outages as the city is forced to institute water outages as a means of demand management.

If now is ever a time to want to be popular then jumping on the band wagon by installing a water tank is your way forward. Soon the neighbour, friend and family will be begging you for a litre of water when their taps run dry.

In an earlier blog I discussed what would happen if Cape Town’s water supply dried out. From the following article you will read that troops have been called in to prevent unrest in the Philippines due to a dire water shortage.This will not be the first time the military has been used to pacify thirsty crowds.

Our inherent attitude about water is our biggest enemy. When water restrictions are implemented we tend to complain about the increase in cost but luckily for us we still have the luxury of fresh water from our taps. We might decide to shower a little shorter and have peace with our gardens becoming a little neglected. After many summer seasons we become conditioned to believe the winter rains will save us. But what are the structural flaws in this belief?

What has lead this belief to become ingrained in us has been the Western Cape’s ability to dam more water sources and augment our fresh water supply. Up until now our water supply has equaled our water demand. Unfortunately, since the Berg River Scheme was completed, Cape Town has run out of new available resources. Let us not forget that the City’s population is still increasing as more and more people choose to settle in the Fairest Cape.

Can you afford to take the risk and run out of water? Can you imagine staring at a water faucet waiting in desperation for only a little liquid to spurt out while you dream of that first sip?

Speak to your Water Rhapsody dealer about water tanks, rainwater harvesting and grey water recycling. There is no need to fear the coming water outages, you can have your private reserve to manage as you please.

Troops sent to prevent water riots

The Philippine government is sending troops into Manila to prevent unrest as authorities distribute water to some of the million-plus people affected by an ongoing shortage.

Many in Manila have been left with limited supplies or no water at all this week after water levels at the Angat Dam, the main source for the capital, fell to a critically low point following a prolonged drought.

Although the situation was improving with the onset of the rainy season, Public Works Secretary Rogelio Singson told reporters on Friday that the government had mobilised trucks and tankers to provide water to the worst hit areas.

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